This just in: Mashable op-ed states the obvious

In a ridiculous, duh-inducing article, author Chris Taylor explains how Apple doesn’t make money on apps because their product focus is in hardware.

*crickets*

This profound insight should surprise exactly no one as anyone who has observed Apple anytime in the last 10 years or so, or — as the author pointed out — pretty much since the first iPod.

The question is not why did Apple make iWork and OSX free, it’s why they didn’t make those things available at a really low cost (say $5) that doesn’t even feel like spending money, and get some cream to skim off the top. The “free” (which is only really free if you buy a new Apple product) thing really says more about how threatened they are feeling by their competitors that they feel the need to throw their productivity suite at people’s faces than it does about being innovative in how they are marketing and selling their products. We should realize by now that when you buy an Apple product, you are buying it because of the device not because of the stuff you can run on the device.

Apple's Backwards Business Model Upends Everything We Know.

Theme update and a mad dash to fix broken stuff

So Museum Core was pushed live to the WordPress.org repo today. Of course I immediately switched my blog from the Twenty Fourteen theme I was testing to Core because, you know, it’s my freaking theme. And immediately I ran into some issues. If you are using Core and experience any of these, here are the fixes.… Continue reading Theme update and a mad dash to fix broken stuff

Nginx config with WordPress multisite on DreamHost

Probably I should post this on the DreamHost wiki BUT I wanted to throw this out that I figured out a solution to an issue I was having on WordPress multisite since migrating to nginx… The problem The issue is that, while permalinks were working as expected, images were all broken, particularly when you were on… Continue reading Nginx config with WordPress multisite on DreamHost

So, today the WordPress 3.8 Admin Help team met up in #wordpress-sfd — a fact that I would have forgotten entirely about had I not been at my computer coding at the time . Siobhan and one other made the meeting. That was fine. You may recall I mentioned something a while ago about getting involved in core development.  Siobhan said she wouldn’t be able to be the team lead because she’s got lots of stuff going on until December, so a new team lead would need to be figured out. I proposed waiting until next week to make the decision. But I somehow found myself taking charge of things anyway, making decisions, asking important questions and ultimately I resigned to just being the team lead because probably no one else would jump up to do it anyway.

So, yeah. I’m now the team lead for Admin Help. I guess this means that I’ll wind up on the credits page if this gets integrated into core in some form or other.

What I’m working on: building a plugin for book reviews

Last year, I met with some of the peeps from the Open Classroom‘s School Library (and Library Committee) to come up with ideas for how the Open Classroom website could better serve them. This was part of an existing process I was going through for planning the update to the website that I launched a… Continue reading What I’m working on: building a plugin for book reviews

Twenty Fourteen

This year, I’ve made it a goal to get more involved in WordPress. Not just peripheral, documentation projects, not just committing plugins and themes to the repository, but also contributing (in whatever form it takes) to core. And, okay, there’s an ulterior motive at work — 3.8 is the release that Matt is leading. So I… Continue reading Twenty Fourteen

Here’s something I learned the hard way today.

If you are using Genericons in your WordPress theme, and you’re enqueueing it like this:

wp_register_style('genericons',get_template_directory_uri().'/genericons/genericons.css',false,$theme['Version']);
wp_enqueue_style( 'genericons' );

…you’re going to run into problems if Jetpack is enabled, because Jetpack uses the same method. Normally this wouldn’t be that much of an issue, but their version of the Genericons font is older and doesn’t include some of the newer icons — which will just be missing if you’re using the Jetpack version. So, to resolve this, you’ll need to make your Genericons handle more unique, e.g.

wp_register_style('mytheme-genericons',get_template_directory_uri().'/genericons/genericons.css',false,$theme['Version']);
wp_enqueue_style( 'mytheme-genericons' );

Update

This has officially been fixed and will be resolved in the next Jetpack release. There’s also a discussion over here about possibly including Genericons in core, which I wholeheartedly support. Thanks George and Jeremy for being so on top of things that they happened to notice my little blog post out in the middle of Nowhere, Blogosphere USA.