Perception is Reality

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Timeless Me

The modules/chapters/sections/whatever you want to call them are short. 15 – 20 minutes each. This is shorter than I expected but it means they are pretty quick and easy to go through. Each module is split into a few sections with a blog post and maybe an activity or something to go with it. Not… Continue reading Perception is Reality

Timeless Me

This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Timeless Me

I’m a geek. A tech guy. I spend most of my day sitting on my ass and staring at my iMac. I’m vegan and gluten-free, so I generally think that I eat pretty well, but the constant activity (in front of the computer) in order to do things like finish projects and get paid doesn’t leave much… Continue reading Timeless Me

Do we really need comments anymore?

Once upon a time, comments were king. The number of comments you got on a post not only represented the conversation surrounding that post but also measured its impact. This inevitably led to ways of gaming the system — spammers used comments to implant their backlinks to their black market viagra sites, and would-be and/or… Continue reading Do we really need comments anymore?

No matter what else you may pay for when you hire a developer, you will always be paying for these two things:

1) Their time. Every developer I know is busy, including myself. That means, in order for something to be good enough for them to stop whatever else it is that they are working on, you need to be willing to make it worth their time. This may be that the project is particularly interesting to them or it may be monetarily. Either way, you will be bidding on their time against any number of other projects that are already attracting their attention.

2) Experience. By hiring a developer, you are making a leap of faith that they know what they are doing. Generally speaking, experience coincides with cost — you won’t find many (if any) experienced developers working for cheap. The market tends to work these things out naturally — an inexperienced developer, overpricing their work, will end up breaking something or getting in over his/her head and will end up getting negative feedback of one form or another and lose clients.

The more you are willing to value these two things in a potential developer, the better the developer you’ll end up with. Anyone can write code, but not everyone comes with the experience and expertise to write good code. If you are  unwilling to apply value to your potential developer’s time and experience, you are unlikely to end up with a very good developer.

New game show idea:

Cooking/dance competition

Contestants must cook a meal (think Iron Chef) while their favorite music is playing. Music must be danceable, and contestants are expected to dance while cooking. A panel of judges scores the contestants based on their dancing as well as the quality of the food. Contestants lose points if they spill, burn themselves or their food.

Crawling back to DreamHost

2 years ago, I left DreamHost because of an issue that turned for the worse when I tried contacting support. This weekend, I started the slow migration back. Here’s the thing. I’ve been extremely happy with the support I’ve gotten from my current host, HostingMatters, which I was referred to by @tenthmuse. But I have… Continue reading Crawling back to DreamHost