New Pluralsight Course: User Roles & Capabilities in WordPress

I’ll tell you a secret: up until a few months ago, user roles and permissions in WordPress were a vast, unexplored land of confusing terms (capabilities and — gasp — meta capabilities) and complex relationships. I didn’t know much, but I did know that if you were playing with new user roles or capabilities and messed up… Continue reading New Pluralsight Course: User Roles & Capabilities in WordPress

So, today the WordPress 3.8 Admin Help team met up in #wordpress-sfd — a fact that I would have forgotten entirely about had I not been at my computer coding at the time . Siobhan and one other made the meeting. That was fine. You may recall I mentioned something a while ago about getting involved in core development.  Siobhan said she wouldn’t be able to be the team lead because she’s got lots of stuff going on until December, so a new team lead would need to be figured out. I proposed waiting until next week to make the decision. But I somehow found myself taking charge of things anyway, making decisions, asking important questions and ultimately I resigned to just being the team lead because probably no one else would jump up to do it anyway.

So, yeah. I’m now the team lead for Admin Help. I guess this means that I’ll wind up on the credits page if this gets integrated into core in some form or other.

Twenty Fourteen

This year, I’ve made it a goal to get more involved in WordPress. Not just peripheral, documentation projects, not just committing plugins and themes to the repository, but also contributing (in whatever form it takes) to core. And, okay, there’s an ulterior motive at work — 3.8 is the release that Matt is leading. So I… Continue reading Twenty Fourteen

Here’s something I learned the hard way today.

If you are using Genericons in your WordPress theme, and you’re enqueueing it like this:

wp_register_style('genericons',get_template_directory_uri().'/genericons/genericons.css',false,$theme['Version']);
wp_enqueue_style( 'genericons' );

…you’re going to run into problems if Jetpack is enabled, because Jetpack uses the same method. Normally this wouldn’t be that much of an issue, but their version of the Genericons font is older and doesn’t include some of the newer icons — which will just be missing if you’re using the Jetpack version. So, to resolve this, you’ll need to make your Genericons handle more unique, e.g.

wp_register_style('mytheme-genericons',get_template_directory_uri().'/genericons/genericons.css',false,$theme['Version']);
wp_enqueue_style( 'mytheme-genericons' );

Update

This has officially been fixed and will be resolved in the next Jetpack release. There’s also a discussion over here about possibly including Genericons in core, which I wholeheartedly support. Thanks George and Jeremy for being so on top of things that they happened to notice my little blog post out in the middle of Nowhere, Blogosphere USA.